A Scenic Tour of the Highlands



Glencoe
Glencoe


Glencoe is the most celebrated glen in Scotland - both for historical association and for overwhelming magnificent mountain scenery. The Three Sisters of Glencoe are three hills called Beinn Fhada, Gearr Aonach and Anonach Dubh.




Glenfinnan at Sunset
Glenfinnan at Sunset
Glenfinnan is one of the most beautiful and romantic places in the West Highlands, where the "Road to the Isles" passes the head of Loch Sheil on the way to Morar and Mallaig. At the head of Loch Sheil stands the prominet Glenfinnan Monument that commemorates the raising by the Marquess of Tullibardine of Prince Charles Edward Stuart's standard on the 19th of August 1745 as a rallying point for the clans. It was over the hill to the north that Lochiel and his clansmen marched to join the Prince.


Orkney
The Orkney Coastline
Orkney lies some 20 miles to the north of the mainland of Scotland by Caithness and contains sixty seven islands, of which twenty one are inhabited. The city of Kirkwall, with the Cathedral of St Magnus, almost nine centuries old, is its capital.


Gigha Island
Gigha Island near Kintyre
Gigha Island, Argyll, is one of the Inner Hebrides. It's name being properly interpreted as "Isle of God". The island is only six miles long. There are attractive sandy beaches on the East coast.


Loch Linnhe at Sunset
Loch Linnhe at Sunset
Ben Nevis rises above Loch Linnhe which forms part of the Caledonian Canal.


Loch Arkaig
Loch Arkaig
Loch Arkaig is close by Achnacarry, the seat of the Camerons of Lochiel. During the Rising of '45, an unspecified but large amount of gold was sent from France to help the Jacobite cause, but it arrived too late. The treasure was buried somewhere in Arkaig and has never been found. The Loch of Arkaig is of singular beauty.


The Island of Harris
The Island of Harris
The island of Harris is in the Outer Hebrides. This - though always, and rightly, spoken of as an island - is firmly attached to the larger, more populous island of Lewis. The immediate differences between Harris and Lewis are to be found in the wildness of the attractive scenery in Harris and the lack of, in the Harris people, of a quality that we have called "latent wildness" lying beneath the courteous surface of the bold Lewisman. The chief scenic appeal of Harris lies in its variety. It has - particularly in its northern end, adjacent to Lewis - far higher hills than those in its sister isle.
The Tour Continues...

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